Wednesday, 9 March 2016

Online Photography Schools, Photography Schools Online, Online Photography Classes



http://www.thecompellingimage.com/


Once you’ve developed skill to observe people, without direct stares, you’ll multiply your opportunities to capture candid moments.  Develop your ability to “people watch” by visiting popular locations, such as festivals, train stations, markets and the like.  Such places are the easiest to observe people on the move, without standing out as a voyeur.  These kinds of localities are great for getting the “hang” of people watching, without being obvious. 

It is here that you’ll become more focused online photography classes to the nuances of gestures and body language and how they might bring “moments” and emotions to the photos you capture.

Become Invisible
Choose a spot and stay there. Soon you’ll become “part of the furniture” and go unnoticed. This is when the candid photos begin. This technique requires time and patience for the situation to happen – and for you to capture telling and compelling photographs online photography courses.  Not all locations are the same, of course.  If you’re one of three people at a sidewalk cafe, chances are your “invisibility” will take a while.  The more crowded and fluid the situation becomes, the better your chances are of capturing such images in shorter time.

Try to blend in with those around you.  Stay away from bright, flashy clothes and a big camera bag.  Be quiet and discreet.  One camera, one lens will do.  And be sure to have your camera / smartphone on the ready – on the chair next to you or in your hand and on your lap.  Your aim is to capture that peak “moment” of a situation you’ve had your eye on.

With camera autofocus systems being what they are today, there’s no one who can focus quicker, manually.  Let your camera doe the work and place all your attention to the scene and subject. Multi-focus points work well for capturing the subject at the peak moment of action, but if you’re using just one focal point centred in your viewfinder, don’t forget to recompose your shot before squeezing the shutter button.  Centred subjects are much less dynamic and interesting than those positioned slightly off-centre or moved to a “rule-of-thirds” location.
There's a fine line between being part of a situation and simultaneously removed enough from it to anticipate moments and capture them at their peak.  If you are the centre of attention, you won't be getting those moments.  Instead, another photographer might be capturing them of you!   So the aim is to be involved, but not to the point where all eyes are on you.  It's a dance of sort, where you enter conversations and leave them again and where you learn just when to pull back to get the shot.  It takes practice and the more you do it, the more intuitive this "dance" becomes.

Whether showcasing a restaurant or hotel, marketing a house or flat, photographing for an interior designer or simply taking pictures for your home decor blog, interior photography is playing an increasingly important role online and in print.  But today’s audience is sophisticated.  The bar is set high.  It takes a creative blend of camera craft, design and professionalism to catch the viewer’s eye these days.  So here are some tips on just how to do that.
Choose Your Kit:
Quick “snappies” with a smartphone just don’t cut it.  But stunning interior photography doesn’t mean an expensive “Flag Ship” camera and a multitude of lenses, either.
However, you will need a few basics.  For starters, a wide angle lens in the 16mm – 24mm range will enable you to capture an expansive perspective from the corners of whatever space you’re working in. Slipping a 50mm or 55mm “Standard” lens into your bag is a good idea, too.  You’ll want to include close-ups of details in your layout, so this and even a macro lens for still finer details, will be definitely to your advantage.
Make a Plan:
Even before the camera is pulled from the bag, there are few important things to consider – like who is the client (not dismissing that it could be you, either)?  What is the end goal of the interior shoot?  What market is being aimed at? 
Keep in mind too that each client has his or her own set of requirements.  Say, for example, you’ll be photographing for an interior designer’s portfolio.  You will want to know exactly what kinds of images are needed.  Should you focus on decorative elements in the room or is it a particular ambience that is most important?  In which case “lighting” will play a major role.  You may even want to add decorative items to a room to create a certain atmosphere.  Carefully positioned cushions or a stack of magazines, for example, can bring much needed character to the overall interior scene.
Or let’s say it’s a restaurant shoot, whereby your aim would be to capture both atmosphere and decor details, along with people in the images.  The goal such approach, of course, being to entice customers to come and dine in a friendly or romantic surrounding.
Whenever appropriate too, try to tell a story through your images.  Focus on interesting details that make the place unique.  Involve people as models to create a congenial mood. And reassess your styling.  Even the smallest of details can make a difference.
- See more at: http://www.thecompellingimage.com/blog/4-capturing-interiors-like-a-pro#sthash.lxGEuPa9.dpuf

Tuesday, 8 March 2016

Travel Photography Tips for Destinations Abroad & Travel Photography Course Online


http://www.thecompellingimage.com/


Have you ever heard yourself saying ‘it looked better in person than in this picture’ when sharing photographs of your journeys with friends and colleagues?  The pictures we make while traveling are our visual memories of the places we visit, and we want those images to have impact and tells a story of our journey in a way that holds the interest of the viewer.  With this online photography course instructed by professional travel photographer and travel photography school online workshop leader, Brenda Tharp, you'll learn just how it's done.  

Travel photography course online is designed to help you compose the strongest pictures you can, to see and capture the daily moments of life, to approach and photograph people in a meaningful way, to express the essence of a place, and to create complete stories of your travel experiences. You’ll learn simple, key concepts that, when applied, will have you making stronger photographs, no matter where you travel.
There’s a fine line between being part of a situation and simultaneously removed enough from it to anticipate moments and capture them at their peak.  If you are the centre of attention, you won’t be getting those moments.  Instead, another photographer might be capturing them of you!   So the aim is to be involved, but not to the point where all eyes is on you.  It’s a dance of sort, where you enter conversations and leave them again and where you learn just when to pull back to get the shot.  It takes practice and the more you do it, the more intuitive this “dance” becomes.
Whether you have travel plans for Europe, Asia – wherever in the world, the more comfortable and skilled you become with handling your camera and capturing “moments” with it, the more successful you will become as a “seasoned” travel photographer.  Get out and practice before you go – photographing in local parks, focusing on people talking, playing games. Go to markets and festivals where people are in a busy or festive mood. Be ready for the hand exchange of goods and payment and capture that “moment.”  The more you’ve done it on home turf, the sooner you’ll be applying your expertise with confidence – over there. If you think about it, there is a range of activities wherein you can pretty much know just what will happen next.  Sporting events are like this, people shopping at an outdoor market, festival observances – just everyday life in general contains its share of interactions and unique moments of occurrence. Watch carefully for a while, “learn” the game or situation and have your camera ready when the repeated action happens once again.  “Click” You’ve captured it!

Interior photography can benefit greatly from the post-production process. Rarely is it that an interior image is captured in the exact way it was first envisioned by the photographer.  Step number one here is to make certain the composition is right to begin with, in order to eliminate the need for large amounts of vertical correction.  And,  keep post-production alterations to a minimum – minimal cropping and just slight adjustments of contrast,  highlights and shadows. - See more at: http://www.thecompellingimage.com/blog/4-capturing-interiors-like-a-pro#sthash.lxGEuPa9.dpuf
Interior photography can benefit greatly from the post-production process. Rarely is it that an interior image is captured in the exact way it was first envisioned by the photographer.  Step number one here is to make certain the composition is right to begin with, in order to eliminate the need for large amounts of vertical correction.  And,  keep post-production alterations to a minimum – minimal cropping and just slight adjustments of contrast,  highlights and shadows. - See more at: http://www.thecompellingimage.com/blog/4-capturing-interiors-like-a-pro#sthash.lxGEuPa9.dpuf

Tuesday, 23 February 2016

Fashion Photography Course Online


The Compelling Image offers online and interactive courses for photographers, video producers and multimedia storytellers of all skill levels and interests. Fashion and Model Photography is an online photography course that will teach you how to capture creative and stunning fashion and model photographs

For models looking to advance their careers or just get that all-important "foot in the door," a stunningly-photographed portfolio or "Book," is of huge importance. Such a professional portfolio of photographs placed on an art director's desk can make or break chances with agencies, Fashion Photography Course magazines and advertisers.  The same holds true for the photographer who produced it.  Photographers who can create exciting photos of their model clients - images ("Tests," as they are known in the industry) that showcase poise, beauty and talent - stand to advance their own careers, too.  This Online Photography Course and model photography lessons and assignments offered by professional top-model-turned-fashion-photographer, Allana Wesley White, shows you hands-on just how it's done.

Attractive models can be found the world-over and the collaboration of model and "testing" photographer can produce amazing portfolios that highlight talent on both sides of the camera.  Taught by Allana Wesley White, a top professional international model-turned-top-professional-model-photographer, this Online Photography Classes will equip you with all you need for a solid start in one of the most exciting fields the photographic industry has to offer.  This hands-on Travel Photography Course Online and its practical assignments will supply you with the knowledge, skills, experience - and confidence - to photograph a model portfolio with creativity, range and vision.  Working in your own environment, using local models, makeup artists and stylists - or just trying your hand at all yourself, you will learn to create the kinds of "testing" photographs today's commercial market is looking for.  By course's end, you will have begun to compile your own testing portfolio of stunning model imagery - photographs that speak effectively and creativity to industry professionals - or simply to aspiring models knocking on your own studio door.